NEW BOOK: Modernism in Irish Women’s Contemporary Writing

Paige Reynolds | Oxford University Press Modernism in Irish Women’s Contemporary Writing: The Stubborn Mode examines the tangled relationship between contemporary Irish women writers and literary modernism. In the early decades of the twenty-first century, Irish women’s fiction has drawn widespread critical acclaim and commercial success, with a surprising number of these works being commended for their innovative redeployment of literary

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BOOK: Subjectivity and Nationhood in Yeats, Joyce and Beckett

Subjectivity and Nationhood in Yeats, Joyce and Beckett: Nietzschean Constellations By Matthew Fogarty Liverpool Studies in Irish Literature This new publication reconceptualises Friedrich Nietzsche’s position in the intellectual history of modernism and substantively refigures our received ideas regarding his relationship to these Irish modernists. Building on recent developments in new modernist studies, the book demonstrates that Nietzsche is a modernist

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CFP: Tradition and Experimentation in Irish Literature since Modernism

The tension between adherence to traditional modes of expression, and experimentation has underlain modern Irish literature. Regarded as the epitome of Modernist experimental writing, James Joyce went so far in pushing the boundaries of what constituted prose as to become the object of criticism from such different commentators as Lukács and Pound, both of whom found fault with Joyce for

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CFP: Synge And Transnational Modernisms

Recent scholarship on Synge by Gregory Castle (2001) Sinéad Garrigan Mattar (2004), Hélène Lecossois (2021) and Seán Hewitt (2021) have all examined how J.M. Synge’s reflections on rapid and uneven modernity in Ireland can be seen as a modernist aesthetic. Most recently of all, Hewitt has argued that ‘Synge’s influence on twentieth-century modernism (and on postmodernism) is yet to be

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New Book: Ireland, Revolution, and the English Modernist Imagination

By Prof Eve Patten Oxford University Press This book asks how English authors of the early to mid-twentieth century responded to the nationalist revolution in neighbouring Ireland in their work, and explores this response as an expression of anxieties about, and aspirations within, England itself. Drawing predominantly on novels of this period, but also on letters, travelogues, literary criticism, and

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